Categories
Europe Featured Greece Portugal Spain

Winter sun holidays: the AA Roadwatch guide

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The days are getting shorter and the weather is getting cooler… but if you don’t have school-age children, you don’t have to put away the Factor 50 just yet. While peak sun holiday season is drawing to a close, plenty of European destinations hold on to their sunny weather right through the autumn months. In fact, it might be the perfect time for that sun trip: prices are lower, crowds are smaller and you can bask in the knowledge that you’re avoiding cold weather at home!

[/vc_column_text][vc_empty_space height=”32px” image_repeat=”no-repeat”][vc_text_separator title=”TENERIFE (Canary Islands, Spain)” title_align=”separator_align_center” border=”no” background_color=”#ffcc00″ title_color=”#000000″][vc_empty_space height=”32px” image_repeat=”no-repeat”][vc_single_image image=”22261″ border_color=”grey” img_link_target=”_self” img_size=”full”][vc_empty_space height=”32px” image_repeat=”no-repeat”][vc_column_text]If you’re dreaming of long days on the beach, there’s no better place than Tenerife, where the sea is at its warmest in the autumn months. As with the other Canary Islands, it boasts year-round warm weather. Daytime temperatures seldom dip below 20 degrees and rain is fairly rare. The island has no shortage of sandy beaches to laze on, with an unusual twist – many of them have black sand, due to the island’s volcanic origins, so you’ll be guaranteed plenty of variety for your holiday snaps.

Tenerife has been welcoming tourists for over half a century and its resorts stay open 365 days a year. In Playa de las Américas, the biggest resort, you’ll find hotel and apartments for all budgets. If it’s nightlife you’re after, look no further than the Veronicas Strip, full of bars that stay busy long into the night. For those travelling with toddlers though, Los Gigantes on the west coast is a slightly quieter option, with plenty of restaurants centred around a marina.

If you want to venture beyond the pool or beach, the island has plenty to offer. It’s home to two UNESCO heritage sites: Spain’s highest volcano in Teide Mountain Park (where you can take a cable car for unrivalled views) and the picturesque old town of San Cristobál de la Laguna. You can also take boat tours to see dolphins, or have a day out in Loro Parque zoo.

ESSENTIAL INFO: Package holidays start from €350 per person for a week, or if you’d prefer to book independently, flights are available from Dublin, Cork and Shannon (year-round) and Knock (until November) costing around €200 per person return.[/vc_column_text][vc_empty_space height=”32px” image_repeat=”no-repeat”][vc_text_separator title=”THE ALGARVE (Portugal)” title_align=”separator_align_center” border=”no” background_color=”#ffcc00″ title_color=”#000000″][vc_empty_space height=”32px” image_repeat=”no-repeat”][vc_single_image image=”22262″ border_color=”grey” img_link_target=”_self” img_size=”full”][vc_empty_space height=”32px” image_repeat=”no-repeat”][vc_column_text]Portugal’s Algarve region stays sunny well into autumn, with temperatures hovering at the 20 degree mark. Taking up most of the southern coast between the cities of Faro and Lagos, it’s home to over 150 sandy beaches, many of which are framed by spectacular orange cliffs. The Atlantic Ocean gives Portugal a great variety here – there are calm beaches ideal for paddling and catching rays, while others have the perfect conditions for surfers to catch waves, particularly near Lagos.

You’ll still have a large choice of hotels in autumn, with the added bonus of shorter queues for restaurants. Albufeira is the biggest resort town, with a famous strip of bars and clubs to dance until the small hours. Away from the strip, it also has the quieter Old Town, with bars and restaurants to while away the warm autumn nights.

You could easily spend a week relaxing by the pool and exploring the various beaches, but the city of Faro also is well worth a visit, especially its own historic Old Town. History buffs will also like the Castelo de Silves, an impressive Moorish hill-top fortress, while thrill-seekers can enjoy a kayak tour from Lagos. Lagos is also home to a zoo and a national park with playgrounds for those with young children.

ESSENTIAL INFO: Package holidays are available from €200 per person for a week, or flights go from Dublin (year-round) and Cork and Knock (until November), starting from €100 per person return.[/vc_column_text][vc_empty_space height=”32px” image_repeat=”no-repeat”][vc_text_separator title=”CYPRUS” title_align=”separator_align_center” border=”no” background_color=”#ffcc00″ title_color=”#000000″][vc_empty_space height=”32px” image_repeat=”no-repeat”][vc_single_image image=”22263″ border_color=”grey” img_link_target=”_self” img_size=”full”][vc_empty_space height=”32px” image_repeat=”no-repeat”][vc_column_text]Tucked away in the corner of the Mediterranean, Cyprus boasts sea temperatures of up to 26 degrees, so there’s no risk of dipping a toe in and running away shrieking. Or if you’d rather just soak up the sun, there’s an average of nine hours sunshine a day in October, so don’t forget the suncream.

There are resorts dotted around the island, with plenty of hotels to choose from. For nightlife, it can only be Ayia Napa for all-night parties. If that’s not your scene or you’re travelling with infants, try the quieter town of Coral Bay, just outside the resort area in Paphos.

Away from the beaches, Cyprus has plenty for history and culture fans to enjoy, including Aphrodite’s Rock, the 2000-year-old Tomb of the Kings and the huge archaeological sites at Kourion and Salamis. There’s also a wine festival in Limassol and a 10-day arts and culture festival in the capital, Nicosia. The waterparks stay open until late October, while most tourist attractions and zoos are open year-round.

ESSENTIAL INFO: Package holidays start from €450 per person per week. If you’re booking flights only, you’ll need to connect via London Stansted, with a total cost of around €260 per person return.[/vc_column_text][vc_empty_space height=”32px” image_repeat=”no-repeat”][vc_text_separator title=”MALTA” title_align=”separator_align_center” border=”no” background_color=”#ffcc00″ title_color=”#000000″][vc_empty_space height=”32px” image_repeat=”no-repeat”][vc_single_image image=”22264″ border_color=”grey” img_link_target=”_self” img_size=”full”][vc_empty_space height=”32px” image_repeat=”no-repeat”][vc_column_text]Like Cyprus, Malta’s location in the Mediterranean means that summer weather lasts until November, with the mercury lingering in the low twenties. Beach lovers have a choice of gold sand, red sand and flat rocks, while the seas are very warm for swimming and usually clear enough for snorkelling. The catch is that the island gets a little more rain than other destinations in October. However, the majority of days are dry and showers tend to last very short periods of time – so be sure to pack a light raincoat along with your suncream.

Bugibba, on St Paul’s Bay in the north, is the oldest and biggest resort. There’s a vast choice of hotels and apartments to suit all ages, and most of the tourist-aimed bars and restaurants stay open until at least late October. St Julian’s Bay, closer to the capital Valetta, is known for its nightlife and clubs.

Outside the resorts, Malta is full of historic sites worth visiting, especially the old city of Mdina, known as the ‘silent city’. The capital Valetta also has plenty of beautiful old buildings, while the picturesque island of Gozo makes a great day trip, with ferries every 45 minutes from the north of the country. A more unusual attraction is Popeye Village – the set from the 1980 Robin Williams film, which has been turned into a theme park.

ESSENTIAL INFO: Package holidays are available from about €300 per person for a week, while flights run from Dublin year-round, costing around €135 per person return.[/vc_column_text][vc_empty_space height=”32px” image_repeat=”no-repeat”][vc_text_separator title=”ATHENS (Greece)” title_align=”separator_align_center” border=”no” background_color=”#ffcc00″ title_color=”#000000″][vc_empty_space height=”32px” image_repeat=”no-repeat”][vc_single_image image=”22265″ border_color=”grey” img_link_target=”_self” img_size=”full”][vc_empty_space height=”32px” image_repeat=”no-repeat”][vc_column_text]If you’d like a sun holiday with a difference, why not combine it with a city break and head to Athens? If you stay in Glyfada – a beach resort filled with hotels, restaurants and shops to the south of the Greek capital– you can have the best of both worlds. Spend a few days relaxing on the pebbled beaches in Glyfada itself or the sandy beach at Varkiza, where the seas are even warmer than the air, and then take the tram into Athens for sun-soaked sightseeing.

No trip to Athens is complete without a visit to the world-famous Acropolis and Parthenon. The city’s ancient history is very much on display and there are plenty of organised tours. You can also take a cable car to the top of Mount Lycabettus or spend an afternoon wandering the tiny streets of the old town in Plaka.

Set in the shadow of the Acropolis, Plaka is famous for its nightlife, as is the nearby Syntagma area.  If you want to dance the night away, the last tram returns to Glyfada at 2:30am at weekends. (For the real night owls, they start up again at 5:30am!)

ESSENTIAL INFO: Package trips to Athens are relatively rare, but are normally around €300 per person per week. You can also book flights year-round from €135 per person.[/vc_column_text][vc_empty_space height=”32px” image_repeat=”no-repeat”][vc_text_separator title=”FURTHER READING” title_align=”separator_align_center” border=”no” background_color=”#ffcc00″ title_color=”#000000″][vc_empty_space height=”32px” image_repeat=”no-repeat”][vc_column_text]Looking for more ideas for short breaks? See below!

Best things to do in Porto in just 24 hours

Travelling to Berlin – the AA Roadwatch guide

Travelling to Amsterdam – the AA Roadwatch guide

Travelling to Edinburgh – the AA Roadwatch guide[/vc_column_text][vc_empty_space height=”32px” image_repeat=”no-repeat”][vc_text_separator title=”DON’T FORGET!” title_align=”separator_align_center” border=”no” background_color=”#ffcc00″ title_color=”#000000″][vc_empty_space height=”32px” image_repeat=”no-repeat”][vc_column_text]

We hope that everything will run smoothly on your trip, but AA Travel Insurance will give you the peace of mind that you need before you jet off.

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All images used under CC0 licence.

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Categories
Europe Featured Ireland Sport and leisure

Family fun when the sun shines: the AA Roadwatch guide

[vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_column_text]Main pic: public domain

The weather doesn’t always play ball in Ireland, but we’re bound to get at least a few sunny days in the coming weeks. When it happens, you’ll want to make the most of it. The country is full of interesting and exciting day-trip destinations to make family memories over the school holidays – here are a few ideas to get you started.[/vc_column_text][vc_empty_space height=”32px” image_repeat=”no-repeat”][vc_text_separator title=”CYCLE THE GREENWAYS” title_align=”separator_align_center” border=”no” background_color=”#ffcc00″ title_color=”#000000″][vc_empty_space height=”32px” image_repeat=”no-repeat”][vc_single_image image=”22084″ border_color=”grey” img_link_target=”_self” img_size=”full”][vc_empty_space height=”32px” image_repeat=”no-repeat”][vc_column_text]Photo: public domain

Cycling with the family can be stressful – but not on the greenways. These are old railway lines that have been converted into off-road walking and cycling trails. No cars, no junctions and mostly flat terrain: a perfect summer’s day out for young or novice cyclists. You can bring your own bikes or rent them along the way, bring a picnic and enjoy the scenery of a landscape without traffic (a rare sight for us at Roadwatch!).  Each trail snakes under viaducts and through old tunnels, which the kids will love. The Great Western Greenway in Mayo passes a number of beaches and the Waterford one has two rail-themed playgrounds (one at Durrow and one at Ballinroad). Each trail is divided into one-to-two hour sections, but for younger children, your best option is to pick a short stretch of the trail starting and ending at towns that the railway used to serve.

ESSENTIAL INFO

The Great Western Greenway (42km) stretches from Newport to Achill along the Mayo coastline, off the N59, while the Great Southern Trail (40km) snakes from Rathkeale to Abbeyfeale in Limerick, just off the N21.

The Waterford Greenway (46km) travels from Waterford City to Dungarvan, and the Athlone to Mullingar Greenway (40km) does exactly what it says on the tin.

If you don’t have your own bikes, they can be rented along the way – check each trail’s website for their local providers. You can find info on all Irish greenways here.[/vc_column_text][vc_empty_space height=”32px” image_repeat=”no-repeat”][vc_text_separator title=”IMMERSE YOURSELF IN IRELAND’S HERITAGE” title_align=”separator_align_center” border=”no” background_color=”#ffcc00″ title_color=”#000000″][vc_empty_space height=”32px” image_repeat=”no-repeat”][vc_single_image image=”22123″ border_color=”grey” img_link_target=”_self” img_size=”full”][vc_empty_space height=”32px” image_repeat=”no-repeat”][vc_column_text]Photo of Kilkenny Castle by Aldebaran, used under CC-BY-SA-3.0 licence

The Office of Public Works recently made all its heritage sites free for children under 12, so why not get their imaginations going with a trip to a castle or fortress? Ireland’s history is full of rich stories that really come to life in children’s minds at heritage sites across the country. OPW sites include castles such as Donegal Castle, Kilkenny Castle and Ross Castle (Kerry), fortresses like Dún Aonghasa (Galway) and Charles Fort (Cork) and other famous historical sites including the Rock of Cashel (Tipperary), Newgrange/Brú na Bóinne (Meath) and the Glendalough Visitor Centre (Wicklow). Many sites have age-specific tours, or let you wander at your own pace. Bring a picnic on a sunny day (make sure to eat in the designated areas!) and let the little ones immerse themselves in the past.

ESSENTIAL INFO                                                                         

The OPW is in charge of a total of 780 sites, 70 of which have guided tour services. Children under 12 go free to all sites, while adult prices vary for each one.  As well as that, all sites are free for all visitors on the first Wednesday of each month.

You can learn more about all OPW heritage sites here.

Check our Routeplanner for directions to your chosen site, as well as details of any delays or traffic incidents along the way.[/vc_column_text][vc_empty_space height=”32px” image_repeat=”no-repeat”][vc_text_separator title=”GO TO EXTREMES AT AN ADVENTURE PARK” title_align=”separator_align_center” border=”no” background_color=”#ffcc00″ title_color=”#000000″][vc_empty_space height=”32px” image_repeat=”no-repeat”][vc_single_image image=”22214″ border_color=”grey” img_link_target=”_self” img_size=”full”][vc_empty_space height=”32px” image_repeat=”no-repeat”][vc_column_text]Photo: public domain

Want to have a memorable day out, pick up a new skill or two… and maybe even tire the kids out? Try one of the adventure centres around the country, where you can learn to kayak, rock-climb or shoot arrows, among other outdoor pursuits. In Lough Key Forest Park (Roscommon), check out a Segway tour through the forest or try your hand at Boda Borg – a Swedish Crystal Maze where the whole family will have to work together to solve the puzzles and overcome obstacles. Galway’s Delphi Adventure Centre and Louth’s Carlingford Adventure Centre both have a big focus on watersports, but you can also take mountain biking and bushcraft survival lessons in Delphi and climbing and ziplining in Carlingford. Meanwhile in Castlecomer Discover Park (Kilkenny), there’s a new high ropes course and boating lake.

ESSENTIAL INFO

All centres have a wide variety of activities for all age groups, from the little ones right up to the grown-ups, but it’s wise to book in advance where possible.

[/vc_column_text][vc_empty_space height=”32px” image_repeat=”no-repeat”][vc_text_separator title=”SEEK THRILLS AT TAYTO PARK” title_align=”separator_align_center” border=”no” background_color=”#ffcc00″ title_color=”#000000″][vc_empty_space height=”32px” image_repeat=”no-repeat”][vc_single_image border_color=”grey” img_link_target=”_self” image=”22216″ img_size=”full”][vc_empty_space height=”32px” image_repeat=”no-repeat”][vc_column_text]Photo by KillianfromTaytoPark, used under CC-BY-SA-4.0 licence

Crisp-based theme parks aren’t exactly ten-a-penny, so you’re guaranteed a unique day out at Tayto Park. Ireland’s only permanent theme park is famous for its wooden rollercoaster, but there are plenty of attractions to keep the whole family entertained. Older children and adrenaline seekers will love the four themed zones with a skywalk, zipline and water rides (make sure to bring a change of clothes!). For those who are too small for rollercoasters, there are plenty of age-specific playgrounds, a dinosaur walk, mazes and live shows. There’s also a petting zoo – where pygmy goats and Highland cows wander about freely – and a larger wildlife section where you can see big cats and exotic birds. And if you’ve ever wondered how crisps are made, you can take a factory tour (weekdays only) to learn all you ever needed to know.

ESSENTIAL INFO

Tayto Park is located north of Ashbourne, just off the N2 Dublin/Monaghan Rd: turn off at the signs for Dunshaughlin and Ratoath. You can use our Routeplanner to check for any delays or incidents on your journey. Bus Éireann also run direct routes from Dublin and Drogheda (103 and 105).

Entry is from €15 per person, with all-inclusive wristbands from €28. Book in advance when you can, especially at weekends. See here for full details.[/vc_column_text][vc_empty_space height=”32px” image_repeat=”no-repeat”][vc_text_separator title=”EXPLORE THE PHOENIX PARK” title_align=”separator_align_center” border=”no” background_color=”#ffcc00″ title_color=”#000000″][vc_empty_space height=”32px” image_repeat=”no-repeat”][vc_single_image border_color=”grey” img_link_target=”_self” image=”22215″ img_size=”full”][vc_empty_space height=”32px” image_repeat=”no-repeat”][vc_column_text]Photo by Superchilum, used under CC-BY-SA-3.0 licence

For many children, the Phoenix Park is synonymous with Dublin Zoo, which has been delighting visitors young and old for almost two centuries. One of the world’s oldest zoos, it’s home to 400 animals from all over the world, as well playgrounds and exhibitions for all age groups. Outside the zoo, however, the Phoenix Park has enough attractions for a full week’s worth of day trips, with no two days the same. The Phoenix Park Visitor Centre has exhibits on the park’s history and runs free weekly conservation workshops for children ages 6 to 12 on Sunday mornings. At the far end of the park, Farmleigh House has a whole summer programme of free family events, ranging from puppet shows to farmers’ markets. Or for a less structured visit, just take a picnic to one of the green spaces, visit one of the many children’s playgrounds and/or get close to the park’s herd of wild deer, who normally graze near the Papal monument.

ESSENTIAL INFO

The Phoenix Park is located just north-west of Dublin city centre, with the main gates at Parkgate St (near Heuston Station) and Castleknock Rd. There are also a number of side gates. It’s worth planning your route before you head out, as it can be a very long walk from one end of the park to another.  Car parking is available at the Papal Cross, the Lord’s Walk and the Phoenix Park Visitor Centre. Dublin Bus operate a number of routes near the various gates (37, 38, 39, 46a, and 70) and the Luas Red Line stops at Heuston Station, near the Parkgate St entrance.

The Visitor Centre workshops take place each Sunday from 11am – 12pm.  Farmleigh House’s summer programme can be found here. Family tickets for Dublin Zoo start at €49 and can be pre-booked – see here.[/vc_column_text][vc_empty_space height=”32px” image_repeat=”no-repeat”][vc_text_separator title=”MEET DOMESTIC AND EXOTIC ANIMALS” title_align=”separator_align_center” border=”no” background_color=”#ffcc00″ title_color=”#000000″][vc_empty_space height=”32px” image_repeat=”no-repeat”][vc_single_image border_color=”grey” img_link_target=”_self” image=”22220″ img_size=”full”][vc_empty_space height=”32px” image_repeat=”no-repeat”][vc_column_text]Photo: courtesy of Fota Wildlife Park

If you have animal lovers at home but you’re too far from Tayto Park or the Phoenix Park to visit their zoos, don’t fret. There are plenty of places around the country where you can meet animals of all kinds, learn about their habitats and maybe even feed them – education and fun at the same time. Fota Wildlife Park in Cork is one of Ireland’s largest visitor attractions, with animals and plants from around the world. It also runs Arts and Crafts workshops and Family Fun Days throughout the summer. In Kerry, Coolwood Wildlife Park outside Killarney is home to animals including lemurs, macaques and alpacas on a 50 acre site. Stone Hall Visitor Farm in Limerick has all of the usual farm animals, but also a few you mightn’t expect like llamas, peacocks and emus. In Galway, Turoe Pet Farm allows children to get close to rabbits, donkeys and goats, and explore a 14km nature trail. And in the east of the country, Secret Valley Wildlife in Wexford is a growing conservation park, where children can have a go at being a zookeeper for a day.

ESSENTIAL INFO

  • Fota Wildlife Park is just outside Cork City: turn off the N25 Cork/Waterford Rd at J3 Tullagreen. Family tickets start from €48.
  • Coolwood Wildlife Park is off the N72 Killarney Bypass at Coolcaslagh. Family tickets are from €30.
  • Stone Hall Visitor Farm is located in Curraghchase, approx. 20km from Limerick City off the N69 Foynes Rd. Family prices are from €35.
  • Turoe Pet Farm in Galway is not far from the M6 Dublin/Galway Rd at J16 Loughrea, with prices from €24.
  • Secret Valley Wildlife is in Clonroche, Wexford, off the N30 Enniscorthy/New Ross Rd. Family tickets start at €32.

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Check out the AA Roadwatch team’s recommendations for longer breaks within Ireland.

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Categories
Europe Featured France Germany Italy Portugal Spain

AA Roadwatch’s European phrasebook

[vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_column_text]There’s nothing quite like the freedom of a driving holiday. Whether you’re taking your own car on the ferry or hiring one when you get there, driving in Europe is always an adventure. The continent has a huge variety of driving routes, from scenic mountain roads through the French Alps to coastal routes along the Italian shores, to huge Autobahns that get you from A to B in Germany.

But when you’re getting used to driving on the right and desperately trying to work out which destination your sat nav has just dramatically mispronounced, the last thing you need is a language barrier.

While visual road signs are similar right across Europe, written ones still cause confusion, particularly if you’re crossing borders. In Belgium and Switzerland, for example, a sudden change in the language of the road signs is often your only clue that you’ve passed from one region to another.

Our Roadwatch guide decodes some of the most common terms in six major European languages and gives you some phrases to help you out in case you need to ask a local for assistance. So bookmark, print or screen-shot the relevant language(s) before you hit the road, wherever it’s going to take you.

Main photo credit: BarnImages.[/vc_column_text][vc_empty_space height=”32px” image_repeat=”no-repeat”][vc_column_text]Click to jump to each language!

– French
– German
– Spanish
– Dutch
– Portuguese
– Italian[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column][vc_empty_space height=”32px” image_repeat=”no-repeat”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_column_text]

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Road signs from France, though French is also used in Switzerland, Belgium, Luxembourg and Monaco. Photo by Salva Barbera, used under CC licence.

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Motorway
Autoroute – Motorway
No parking
Défense de stationner/ Stationnement Interdit – No Parking
One way
Sens unique – One-way
No entry
Défense d’entrer / Sens interdit – No entry
Toll
Péage – Toll
Diversion
Déviation – Diversion
Give way
Cédez le passage / Cédez la priorité – Give way / Yield
Service station
Station service – Petrol Station

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USEFUL PHRASES

 

My car has broken down. – Ma voiture est tombée en panne.

I have a flat tyre. – J’ai un pneu crevé.

I’ve run out of petrol / diesel. – Je suis tombé(e) en panne sèche.

Is there a petrol station near here? – Y a-t-il une station service près d’ici?

There has been a crash. – Il y a eu un accident de voiture.

I need a tow-truck. – J’ai besoin d’une dépanneuse.

I am an AA Ireland member. – Je suis membre de l’AA en Irlande.

(It’s a breakdown recovery service) – (C’est un service de dépannage.)

It’s a rental car / It’s my own car. – C’est une voiture de location/ C’est ma propre voiture.

Can I park here? How much does it cost? – Est-ce que je peux me garer ici? Ça coûte combien?

Do you speak English? – Parlez-vous anglais?[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column][vc_empty_space height=”32px” image_repeat=”no-repeat”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_column_text]

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Road signs from Germany, though German is also used in Austria, Switzerland, Luxembourg, Liechtenstein and Tyrol in northern Italy. Photo by ChristianSchd, used under CC BY-SA 3.0 licence.

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Motorway
Autobahn – Motorway
No parking
Parkverbot / Parken verboten – No Parking
One way
Einbahnstraβe – One-way
No entry
Einfahrt Verboten – No entry
Toll
Maut / Mautstelle – Toll
Diversion
Umleitung / Umweg – Diversion
Give way
Vorfahrt gewähren / Vorfahrt beachten – Give way / Yield
Petrol station
Tankstelle – Petrol Station

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USEFUL PHRASES

 

My car has broken down. – Ich habe eine Autopanne.

I have a flat tyre. – Ich habe eine platten Reifen.

I’ve run out of petrol / diesel. – Ich habe kein Benzin / Diesel mehr.

Is there a petrol station near here? – Wo finde ich die nächste Tankstelle?

There has been a crash. – Ich hatte einen Unfall.

I need a tow-truck. – Ich brauche einen Abschleppwagen.

I am an AA Ireland member. – Ich bin Mitglied des AA in Irland.

(It’s a breakdown recovery service) – (Das ist eine Pannenhilfe.)

It’s a rental car / It’s my own car. – Es ist eine Mietwagen / Es ist mein eigenes Auto.

Can I park here? How much does it cost? – Kann ich hier parken? Was kostet das?

Do you speak English? – Sprechen Sie Englisch?[/vc_column_text][vc_empty_space height=”32px” image_repeat=”no-repeat”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_column_text]

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Road signs from Spain, though Spanish is also used in Andorra. Photo by Luis Garcia, used under CC-BY-SA-3.0 licence.

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Motorway
Autopista – Motorway
 No parking1
Prohibido aparcar – No Parking
One-way
Dirección única – One-way
No entry1
Prohibido el paso / Prohibida la entrada – No entry
Toll
Peaje – Toll
Diversion
Desvío  – Diversion
Give way
Ceda el paso – Give way / Yield
Petrol station
Estación de servicio – Petrol station

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USEFUL PHRASES

 

My car has broken down. – Mi coche se ha averiado.

I have a flat tyre. – Tengo una rueda pinchada.

I’ve run out of petrol / diesel. – Me quedo sin gasolina (petrol)/ gasóleo (diesel)

Is there a petrol station near here? – ¿Hay una estación de servicio cerca de aquí?

There has been a crash. – Ha habido un choque.

I need a tow-truck. – Necesito una grúa.

I am an AA Ireland member. – Soy miembro/miembra de la AA en Irlanda.

(It’s a breakdown recovery service) – (Es un servicio de asistencia en carretera)

It’s a rental car / It’s my own car. – Es un auto alquilado. / Es mi propio coche.

Can I park here? How much does it cost? – ¿Puedo aparcar aquí? ¿Cuánto cuesta?

Do you speak English? – ¿Habla usted inglés?[/vc_column_text][vc_empty_space height=”32px” image_repeat=”no-repeat”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_column_text]

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Road signs from the Netherlands though Flemish, which is used in the Flanders region of Belgium, is very similar to Dutch. Photo by Johann H. Addicks / addicks@gmx.net, used under GFDL – GNU Free Documentation License.

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 Motorway
Autoweg – Motorway
No parking
Niet parkeren / Parkeren verboden – No Parking
One way
Éénrichtingsverkeer – One-way traffic
No entry
Geen toegang / Geen ingang – No entry
Toll
Tol / Tolweg – Toll
Diversion
Omleiding – Diversion
Give way
Voorrang verlenen / Geef voorang – Give way / Yield
Petrol station
Tankstation – Petrol Station

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USEFUL PHRASES

 

My car has broken down. – Mijn auto is kapot.

I have a flat tyre. – Ik heb een lekke band.

I’ve run out of petrol / diesel. – Ik heb geen benzine / diesel meer.

Is there a petrol station near here? – Is er een tankstation in de buurt?

There has been a crash. – Er is een ongeluk gebeurd.

I need a tow-truck. – Ik heb een takelwagen nodig.

I am an AA Ireland member. – Ik ben lid van de AA in Ierland.

(It’s a breakdown recovery service) – Dat is een pechhulp.

It’s a rental car / It’s my own car. – Dit is een huurwagen. / Dit is mijn wagen.

Can I park here? How much does it cost? – Kan ik hier parkeren? Wat kost dat?

Do you speak English? – Spreekt u Engels?[/vc_column_text][vc_empty_space height=”32px” image_repeat=”no-repeat”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_column_text]

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Road signs from Portugal. Photo by Diego Delso, used under CC BY-SA 3.07 licence.

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Motorway
Autoestrada – Motorway
No parking
Proibido estacionar – No Parking
One-way
Sentido Único – One-way
No entry
Proibido entrar – No entry
Toll
Portagem – Toll
Diversion
Desvío – Diversion
Give way
Dar Prioridade – Give way / Yield
Service station
Posto de gasolina / Bomba de gasolina – Petrol Station

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USEFUL PHRASES

 

My car has broken down. – Meu carro avariou-se.

I have a flat tyre. – Tenho um pneu furado.

I’ve run out of petrol / diesel. – Eu não tenho mais gasolina/ diesel.

Is there a petrol station near here? – Onde fica um posto de gasolina?

There has been a crash. – Houve um acidente.

I need a tow-truck. – Preciso de um guincho.

I am an AA Ireland member. – Eu sou membro da AA na Irlanda.

(It’s a breakdown recovery service) – É um serviço de pronto socorro de carros.

It’s a rental car / It’s my own car. – Esse carro é alugado. / Esse é meu próprio carro.

Can I park here? How much does it cost? – Posso estacionar aqui?  Quanto custa?

Do you speak English? – Você fala inglês?[/vc_column_text][vc_empty_space height=”32px” image_repeat=”no-repeat”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_column_text]

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Road signs from Italy, though Italian is also used in Switzerland and San Marino. Photo by Armando Mancini, used under CC BY-SA 2.0 licence.

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Motorway
Autostrada – Motorway
No parking
Divieto di Parcheggiare / Sosta Vietata – No Parking
One-way
Senso Unico – One-way
No entry
Divieto di Accesso – No entry
Toll
Pedaggio – Toll / Stazione – Toll plaza
Diversion
Deviazione – Diversion
Give way
Dare la Precedenza – Give way / Yield
Petrol station
Stazione di servizio – Petrol Station

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USEFUL PHRASES

 

My car has broken down. – La mia macchina è in panne.

I have a flat tyre. – Ho una gomma a terra.

I’ve run out of petrol / diesel. – Sono senza benzina / diesel.

Is there a petrol station near here? – C’è una stazione di servizio qui vicino?

There has been a crash. – C’è stato un incidente.

I need a tow-truck. – Necessito di un carro attrezzi.

I am an AA Ireland member. – Sono un membro dell’AA in Irlanda.

(It’s a breakdown recovery service) – È un servizio di soccorso stradale.

It’s a rental car / It’s my own car. – È un auto a noleggio. / È la mia auto.

Can I park here? How much does it cost? – Posso parcheggiare qui? Quanto costa?

Do you speak English? – Parla inglese?[/vc_column_text][vc_empty_space height=”32px” image_repeat=”no-repeat”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_column_text el_class=”Hiring and Driving a Car in Europe”]More advice from AA Ireland:

Hiring and Driving a Car in Europe

Top Tips if you’re Hiring a Car in Europe

Driving in Germany – top tips and advice[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

Categories
Austria Christmas Europe Featured Finland Germany Spain Sweden

European Christmas Markets – AA Roadwatch

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The most wonderful time of year is fast approaching, and with it the traditional Christmas markets that fill entire cities across Europe with the warm scents of mulled wine and hot chocolate. Originating in Germany and Austria, where the biggest markets are still held, the tradition has spread to cities right across the continent. No matter where you go, you’re guaranteed a Christmas experience to remember. Here are some of AA Roadwatch’s favourites for 2017, all a relatively short flight away from Ireland.

[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_empty_space height=”32px” image_repeat=”no-repeat”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][image_with_text image=”21603″ title=”ONE OF THE OLDEST IN EUROPE – VIENNA”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_column_text]No-one is entirely sure which Christmas Market is the oldest, but Vienna’s claim certainly holds weight: the city’s residents were first granted permission to hold a December Market (Krippenmarkt) in 1298. The main market is held in the park outside the City Hall on Rathausplatz. You can’t fail to feel the Christmas spirit as you enter the square through a giant candlelit arch, leading to 150 stalls selling tree decorations, handmade crafts and confectionery. This year, you can also skate your way there, with ice rinks forming paths through the park, and the event spills into the City Hall itself, home to gingerbread workshops for children. Elsewhere, there are three Christmas villages in the city – at Maria-Theresien-Platz, at Belvedere Palace and in the Altes AKH – where shoppers are serenaded by carol-singing gospel choirs. And if it’s tradition you’re after, try the Old Viennese Market for classic mangers and ceramics. For late arrivals, the Christmas Market at the Schönbrunn Palace transforms into a New Year’s Market on December 27th: why should the festivities end before the season is out?

DATES FOR 2017:

Vienna Christmas Market (Rathausplatz): November 18 – December 30

Maria-Theresien-Platz: November 22 – December 26

Belvedere Palace: November 24 – December 26

Schönbrunn Palace: November 18 – January 1

Photo © Vienna Tourist Board[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_empty_space height=”32px” image_repeat=”no-repeat”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][image_with_text image=”21601″ title=”THE BEST CHANCE OF A WHITE CHRISTMAS – helsinki”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_column_text]While Christmas spirit certainly won’t be lacking at any of this year’s Christmas Markets, there’s no beating a white Christmas. Flurries can’t be guaranteed but it looks like your best chance of a snow-covered market trip is in Helsinki: early indications forecast around 15 days of snow this December. Finland is the home of Santa Claus and its capital prides itself on Christmas traditions, particularly the St Thomas Market (Tuomaan Markkinat), which fills Senaatintori Square with over 120 stalls selling handmade Finnish decorations, craftwork and food. Smaller markets are also held on Mannerheimintie (Helsingin Joulumaailma) – with traditional wooden cabins – and on the harbour, where all products are made by Finnish women and sold for charity (Naisten Joulumessut Wanhaasa Satamassa). To warm up, try a mug of Glögi, the traditional Christmas drink made of spiced wine, almonds and raisins, sometimes with a dash of vodka for good measure. As well as the market stalls, watch out for the Tiernapojat – a traditional play acted out daily in the streets by boys dressed as the Three Wise Men. When you’ve finished your shopping, head to the train station: the esplanade outside becomes an ice rink each winter, complete with a café serving a perfect winter’s hot chocolate.

DATES FOR 2017:

Tuomann Joulumarkkinat (St Thomas): December 2-22

Helsingin Joulumaailma: December 3 – January 7 (except 24-26)

Naisten Joulumessut: December 6-10

Photo © Jussi Hellsten / Visit Helsinki[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_empty_space height=”32px” image_repeat=”no-repeat”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][image_with_text image=”21602″ title=”A DAZZLING ARRAY OF LIGHTS – GOTHENBURG”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_column_text]Gothenburg may only see six hours of daylight each day in December, but that’s not a problem at Liseberg theme park, where the Christmas market is adorned with over five million fairy lights. For the full experience, you can arrive by either vintage tram or canal boat, with mulled wine served on board. The market is the biggest in Sweden, with 80 stalls offering candles, decorations, roasted almonds and hot chocolate, which you will definitely need with the temperature generally hovering around zero. And if you haven’t crossed everything off your shopping list by the time you’ve finished your chocolate, there’s also a unique designer market within Liseburg tower. Along with the usual theme park rides, you’ll find a medieval village, a Lapland-inspired zone and a children’s area inhabited by giant rabbits. Outside of the park, Gothenburg city centre is also home to a number of smaller markets, including an eight-day Christmas festival at Tjolöholm Castle.

DATES FOR 2017

Liseburg Amusement Park: mid-November – late-December

Tjolöholm Castle: November 17-26 (except 14-15)

Photo © Go:teborg[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_empty_space height=”32px” image_repeat=”no-repeat”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][image_with_text image=”21587″ title=”The Biggest Choice OF MARKETS – Berlin”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_column_text]Christmas markets are synonymous with Germany, where the Christkindlmarkt is a centuries-old tradition. For a true German experience, head to Berlin: with over 60 individual markets scattered across the capital, there’s no escaping the smell of roasted chestnuts and glazed fruit. The largest is held in Spandau, Berlin’s Old Town, boasting over 1000 types of Christmas decorations and a huge range of German delicacies, including glühwein and Lumumba (cocoa with a dash of rum). One of the most atmospheric markets is held in the grounds of Charlottenburg Palace, with stalls selling crafts and seasonal food, as well as a children’s amusement park complete with a petting zoo and carousel. Right in the city centre, a market in Gendarmenmarkt specialises in traditional embroidery and wood-carving, gourmet food and an impressive programme of shows. For a different choice, try the Scandinavian-themed Lucia Weihnachtsmarkt in Prenzlauer Berg, with Swedish fires and Nordic music. Of course, you could also just wander the streets at random: with dozens of markets in the city, you’re guaranteed to stumble across some gems.

If this has piqued your interest in the German capital, click here for our Berlin travel guide.

DATES FOR 2017:

Spandau: November 27 – December 23

Charlottenburg: November 27 – December 26 (except 24)

Gendarmenmarkt: November 27 – December 31

Lucia Weihnachtsmarkt: November 27 – December 23[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_empty_space height=”32px” image_repeat=”no-repeat”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][image_with_text image=”21582″ title=”SOMETHING OUT OF THE ORDINARY – BARCELONA”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_column_text]Barcelona is one of the few cities where Christmas Markets don’t follow the German template: you’re more likely to find horchata and chorizo than glühwein and bratwurst. Following Catalan traditions, the Fira de Santa Llucía is held outside the cathedral and divided into sections, each offering different products. It’s something of a local tradition to buy a few handmade figurines a year until you have a complete crib scene. On other stalls, you’ll find mistletoe, trees and handicrafts, as well as the (in)famous Caganer. The Caganer is a typical Catalan Christmas decoration: a man in typical Catalan dress, squatting, with his trousers down. Bizarre as it seems, this figurine has been a staple of otherwise religious Catalan nativity scenes since the 1700s, and he is said to bring good harvests for the following year. You’ll also be able to buy a handmade Caga Tío: a log with a face that Catalan children look after until Christmas Eve, when it fills its litter tray with presents. Not too far away, the Fira de Reis stretches along the Gran Vía, specialising in toys, jewellery and churros con chocolate. And if you stay until after Christmas, you can join the fanfare and see the Three Wise Men arrive by boat on the night of January 5th. The trio then parade through the city, handing out gifts and sweets to the waiting children.

DATES FOR 2017:

Fira de Santa Llúcia: November 24 – December 23 (approx.)

Fira de Reis de la Gran Via: December 21 – January 6[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_empty_space height=”32px” image_repeat=”no-repeat”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_column_text]

If you’ve been inspired to plan a Christmas trip away, be sure to purchase Travel Insurance first!

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Click here to check out Lauren’s guide to a Scottish getaway in Edinburgh.

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Categories
Europe Featured Scotland

Travelling to Edinburgh – the AA Roadwatch guide

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It’s no surprise that Edinburgh was once known as the Athens of the North. A city of exquisite medieval architecture built on hills, Scotland’s capital makes for a great autumn city break. Whether you’re a history buff, a comedy fan or an urban explorer, there are plenty of attractions for all ages and budgets. And, take it from a former resident, AA Roadwatch’s Lauren Beehan – you get used to the hills. Eventually.

[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_empty_space height=”32px” image_repeat=”no-repeat”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_text_separator title=”WHY GO NOW?” title_align=”separator_align_center” border=”no” background_color=”#ffcc00″ title_color=”#000000″][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_empty_space height=”32px” image_repeat=”no-repeat”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_column_text]Edinburgh makes a great destination for an autumn city break, when the parks are resplendent in orange and yellow. Known as one of the world’s most haunted cities, it really comes into its own at Hallowe’en, with numerous ghost tours, cemetery trails and guided underground visits. There really is no better place to see off All Hallow’s Eve than the supposedly haunted pubs on Niddry St and Cowgate, complete with spooky vaulted basements under the medieval Old Town. For those more easily scared, there are plenty of Harry Potter-themed events, ceilidhs and Celtic Samhuinn celebrations.

From late November, the Christmas festival adds craft markets, ice rinks and a ferris wheel to your usual list of must-sees in the city. The world famous Hogmanay celebrations on New Years’ Eve attract crowds with the street party, fireworks and outdoor concerts. It’s also the only night of the year that the imposing clock above the Balmoral Hotel shows the correct time: the rest of the year, it runs three minutes fast to ensure that travellers make their train at the neighbouring Waverley Station.

But what about the weather? It is cold and it’s always windy, so you’ll need to pack your Arran jumpers and tartan scarves, but let’s be honest: no-one goes to Scotland for a sun holiday.  And, really, who needs an excuse to buy more tartan?[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_empty_space height=”32px” image_repeat=”no-repeat”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_text_separator title=”GETTING AROUND” title_align=”separator_align_center” border=”no” background_color=”#ffcc00″ title_color=”#000000″][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_empty_space height=”32px” image_repeat=”no-repeat”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_column_text]

Edinburgh’s compact city centre is best experienced on foot, although be prepared for uphill struggles. It can be difficult driving in the historic centre: many of these cobbled streets were built before anyone had even dreamed of cars and the Royal Mile is partially pedestrianised.  If you do decide to drive, keep in mind that most on-street parking is pay-and-display. Many car hire companies are based in the airport, with a few city centre offices. Click here for advice on speed limits in Scotland. The newly-built tram line runs from the airport to the city centre via Haymarket, while Lothian Buses provide an inexpensive service throughout the city. A fairly extensive Night Bus network will get you home safely in the wee hours, and taxis are easy to find at designated ranks.

[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_empty_space height=”32px” image_repeat=”no-repeat”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][image_with_text_over icon_size=”fa-lg” image=”21554″ title=”WHAT TO DO” title_size=”65″][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_empty_space height=”32px” image_repeat=”no-repeat”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_column_text]No trip to Edinburgh is complete without visiting the castle and taking the mandatory photo on the esplanade, no matter how windy it is. The castle – which doubles as a handy navigation point, given that it sits on a volcano above the city and lights up at night – actually comprises several buildings and exhibits.

From the castle, you can walk down the Royal Mile (which is longer than a mile) towards Holyrood Palace. This is the main street in Old Town, the oldest part of the city, with a labyrinth of ‘closes’ (narrow medieval streets) off each side. Centuries old, these are worth exploring and serve as useful detours when the main street is full of shoppers stocking up on tartan and shortbread. You can also take a ghost tour from the Royal Mile, although this writer, shamefully, was scared off by the photographs.

On the other side of Princes Street Gardens (above, photo by the author) is New Town, built in a Georgian grid pattern. Princes Street is the main shopping area, while bars and restaurants fill Rose Street and George Street. The best photo opportunities – especially at sunset – are from Calton Hill, home to a curious collection of half-finished monuments.

Make sure to try the national dish of haggis, neeps and tatties (turnips and potatoes). While you’ll hear about deep-fried Mars Bars, this mythical ‘delicacy’ is only available in a handful of chippers.

Edinburgh’s numerous bars are matched only by its multitude of coffee shops. Harry Potter fans can visit the cafés where JK Rowling wrote the early books: looking out the windows, it’s not hard to see where the inspiration for Hogwarts came from.

On a sunny day, climb Arthur’s Seat, one of three extinct volcanoes in the city. If you visit in summer, follow the local tradition and take a disposable barbecue to The Meadows. This is not advised at any other time of year!

A lesser-known walk is along the Water of Leith through Dean Village. Less than fifteen minutes from the bustling city streets, it feels like a country walkway with truly baffling architecture. Stockbridge, a village on the river, holds a great farmers’ market on Sundays: come for the cheese and meats, stay for the cupcakes.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_empty_space height=”32px” image_repeat=”no-repeat”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_text_separator title=”FESTIVALS” title_align=”separator_align_center” border=”no” background_color=”#ffcc00″ title_color=”#000000″][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_empty_space height=”32px” image_repeat=”no-repeat”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_column_text]Edinburgh is the festival capital of Europe and there’s always something going on. If you decide to hold off until next summer there are the world famous August Festivals, when six festivals take place simultaneously. They double the city’s population and make walking in Old Town at 4am feel like crossing Times Square at midday. The Festival Fringe alone boasts 50,000 performances before the month is out. Whether you make plans or let yourself be whirled away by the relentless teams of ‘flyerers’, you’re bound see exciting and unusual shows.

Apart from these stalwarts of the festival calendar, smaller events take place throughout the year, including festivals dedicated to jazz, storytelling, film, science and cake.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_empty_space height=”32px” image_repeat=”no-repeat”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_text_separator title=”DAY TRIPS” title_align=”separator_align_center” border=”no” background_color=”#ffcc00″ title_color=”#000000″][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_empty_space height=”32px” image_repeat=”no-repeat”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_column_text]If you’d like to venture further afield, you’re spoiled for choice. South Queensferry, the home of the impressive Forth bridges, is just one train stop away. Meanwhile the bigger city of Glasgow – great for shopping or events – is just an hour away by car or train. The medieval city of Stirling and even older town of St Andrews are both within 50 kilometres.

Many people use Edinburgh as a base to begin their tour of Scotland’s beautiful Highlands, either by coach or by rental car. If you’re driving, the roads deep in the Highlands are single-lane country routes, with designated points for passing cars travelling in the opposite direction. Popular spots include Fort William, Glencoe, Inverness and the Isle of Skye. Skye is deceptively big: the capital, Portree, is almost an hour’s drive from the bridge at Lochalsh. Once you’re there, though, hike to the Old Man of Storr for unrivalled views of the isle and its neighbours.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_empty_space height=”32px” image_repeat=”no-repeat”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_text_separator title=”FURTHER READING” title_align=”separator_align_center” border=”no” background_color=”#ffcc00″ title_color=”#000000″][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_empty_space height=”32px” image_repeat=”no-repeat”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_column_text]

If you’re planning your next city break, why not consider a trip to Berlin? Check out our guide and learn more about what to expect when visiting the city. Before going on holiday, we advise all travellers to take out AA Travel Insurance. It offers a wide range of travel insurance benefits like flight cancellations, lost or stolen luggage and medical expenses.

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