Young Drivers Struggling To Meet Costs Of Getting On The Road

 The slow progress to date in tackling the insurance crisis are placing significant financial stress on learner drivers, a new survey has found.

In response to a survey of over 4,000 motorists undertaken by AA Young Driver Insurance, almost 6 in 10 respondents (58.69%) stated they strongly believe that learner drivers today face greater financial challenges when trying to get on the road than previous generations. Meanwhile, a further 24.48% were somewhat in agreement with the claim that those learning today face greater financial challenges than learner drivers in the past.

“Learner drivers aren’t the only ones suffering as a result of the current slow rate of progress in tackling the insurance crisis, but they are one of the hardest hit groups when it comes to facing high insurance premiums alongside their other motoring costs,” Conor Faughnan, AA Director of Consumer Affairs stated. “While some progress has been made against the recommendations of the Cost of Insurance Working Group, a great deal still needs to be done. In fact many of the issues which contributed to the insurance crisis when it first began in 2015, such as a reliance on outdated technology, poor quality data sharing among insurers and high personal injury payouts, remain unresolved.”

 “Ultimately there’s no single factor which would act as a quick fix to high insurance costs, but a greater urgency from all stakeholders to resolve the crisis is needed. While other issues such as Brexit and the housing crisis have diverted government’s attention away from insurance, we do need to see some of the drive to find a solution that existed in Leinster House in 2015 and 2016 make a return.”

 The survey also found that a majority of motorists believed that issues with driving test waiting times experienced earlier this year may have contributed to the financial stress experienced by learner drivers. Of those surveyed by the AA, 41.51% strongly agreed that waiting list issues for those applying for a driver test were placing unnecessary financial stress on young drivers.

“Earlier this year many learner drivers were experiencing significant delays in securing a test date, but to be fair to the RSA the measures they introduced in response to this issue have been successful. Currently every testing centre is meeting the RSA’s target waiting time of no more than 10 weeks, something which those seeking a test date will welcome,” Faughnan added. “Unfortunately it has always been the case that your first years on the road will be more expensive, but certainly there is more that can be done, particularly in relation to the insurance crisis, to help ease some of the burden young drivers currently face.”